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Posts Tagged ‘Veterans Day 2019’

Just as these veterans raised their hand to swear an oath to serve their country, you, too, can join in committing to support them through Operation Homefront’s #RaiseYourHand campaign. Learn more at http://www.operationhomefront.org/RaiseYourHand

To honor our Nation’s veterans, Operation Homefront would like to share the stories of the veterans who have touched our lives through our programs.  Please join us every day as we feature a new veteran in our #11Days11Stories series leading up to Veterans Day 2019. Today we can take a humorous look back at a life of service through the family’s eyes:

As Haily Radnor and her husband Steve, an Air Force first sergeant, near retirement in early 2019 after 24 years of service, she looks back fondly on their time in the military, while also looking forward to having Steve around more often.

The Radnors and their five children – Austin, 13; Sierra, 9; Cheyenne, 6; Skyler, 3; and Logan, 5 months – plan to move from Colorado Springs, Colorado, where they are stationed now, to Pennsylvania to be closer to Steve’s extended family.  For his second career, Steve may stay in human resources because he has enjoyed his most recent assignment as a first sergeant, caring or the morale and welfare of airmen.

Hailey has a few thoughts on what she will (and won’t miss) about their life of service as a military family.  Thoughts I am sure many of us will nod our head’s in agreement about:

What she will miss:

  • Belonging to the larger military family, and feeling the love, from time to time, from people and organizations who care, and value their service, including Operation Homefront. Haily attended a May 2018 Operation Homefront Star-Spangled Baby shower in Colorado Springs at which she and about 100 other new and expecting military members and spouses enjoyed each other’s company, and received special gifts, including Cracker Barrel rocking chairs, cribs and other necessities.

“Knowing that there are those out there that do appreciate what we do, that life isn’t being taken for granted … makes it that much easier for us to get up and do our thing every day,” Haily said.

  • The strong bonds they have formed with other military families. She and her military spouse friends are flexible, accepting of change and patient because they know that being high-strung and uptight doesn’t work.  “Your children reflect how you behave,” she said.  “It’s not worth getting upset over little things.”
  • Being the friend she would like to have. “Everyone needs someone to be strong for them when they can’t be,” she said.  That requires putting yourself out there, and meeting people without fear of being hurt even though that can be scary.  “It makes us better people and it teaches us.”

At the same time, Haily recommends, “allow yourself to make mistakes because if you don’t, you cannot learn from them to become a better person.”

  • The sense of duty, knowing that there’s a purpose in my husband’s work.”
  • Their newborn won’t know the excitement and rewards of military life. Yet if Steve stayed in, he likely would go remote for a year, missing much of their baby’s first two years of life, so they decided it’s “time to hang up the boots.”
  • Being surrounded by others who don’t take their country or their lives for granted. Having known families who lost loved ones in war, she and Steve always make it a point to teach their children to be appreciative, respectful and accepting and inclusive of everyone, regardless of differences in age, background, appearance or income.  “All they see is a new friend and that’s all that matters.”

“If you ever go on to a military base and “Taps” is playing, the kids at the playground freeze and stand toward that music and put their hands on their heart,” Haily said.  “Life just freezes for those few moments.”

What she won’t miss:

  • Steve’s long, frequent absences. Though all but one of his deployments happened before they married in 2004, he deployed in 2015 to Kuwait for six months.  They had four children at the time.  He also has had assignments that kept him away from home, including his current one, which requires him to be on call 24/7.  When they were relative newlyweds with only one child at the time, Steve performed maintenance for the Thunderbirds, the Air Force’s demonstration squadron, and was traveling more than 200 days a year.  Even when he was home, he worked 12- to 15-hour days, she said. Their son, Austin, now 13, didn’t understand why his father was gone, or would only return for short periods.  “The emotions on him were really hard,” she said. “It was hard for him not having his dad, even though we could have our little Skype talks on occasion a couple times a week” at most.  It wasn’t enough to take the place of his daily presence.

Steve’s schedule improved some when they moved to Germany, but he still worked long hours as an NCO instructor.

  • Her kids having to repeatedly adjust to new communities and schools. When the Radnors, who moved seven times over 14 years and four duty stations, relocated to Arizona from Germany, their kids had difficulty “breaking in” to established friend circles, and felt excluded.  There was a stark contrast between their military-friendly neighborhood in Germany and their more civilian-centric community in Arizona, where many neighbors had never traveled outside the state, she said.  It was a “heartbreaking” time, she said, but improved in Colorado.
  • Knowing that more military members will lose their lives serving their country, never to return to their families. And that countless others will spend lengthy periods away from their families.

What do you or will you miss (or not) about YOUR military service?  Tell us in the comments.

Operation Homefront is a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit whose mission is to build strong, stable, and secure military families so they can thrive — not simply struggle to get by — in the communities they have worked so hard to protect. For over fifteen years, we have provided programs that offer: RELIEF (through Critical Financial Assistance and transitional housing programs), RESILIENCY (through permanent housing and caregiver support services) and RECURRING FAMILY SUPPORT programs and services throughout the year that help military families overcome the short-term bumps in the road so they don’t become long-term chronic problems. Please visit us at www.operationhomefront.org to learn more or support our mission.

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Rita is on her way to receiving the deed to her home early. “I have never been in such a financially stable position in my life”

To honor our Nation’s veterans, Operation Homefront would like to share the stories of the veterans who have touched our lives through our programs.  Please join us every day as we feature a new veteran in our #11Days11Stories series leading up to Veterans Day 2019. 

Rita looks back proudly on her Navy service from 1998 through 2003, working as an electronics technician, testing portable communication equipment on land and on ships. She was twice named junior sailor of the year at her command. “The military is a part of me. … It always has been and it always will be.”

After five eventful years of active-duty Navy service, and another 10 years as a Navy spouse, Rita Starks found herself at a low point.  She and her husband had divorced, and she couldn’t afford a place of her own.

So she and her two kids moved back in with her parents in Wisconsin. She thought they would live in her parents’ basement for only a few months. It turned into 4½ years.

The opportunity to move her family in October 2016 into a donated, three-bedroom, mortgage-free house in Cambridge, Wisconsin, was more than she could have hoped for. The home, donated by JPMorgan Chase through Operation Homefront’s Homes on the Homefront program, was about a half hour from her parents, and just the boost Rita needed to improve the lives of her children.

Rita’s low-cost lifestyle and participation in our Homes on the Homefront program has enabled her to focus on saving money. She was disciplined about paying off debt before entering HOTH, and says the program’s goals motivate her to follow the old adage to pay yourself first. “I see … savings money as a bill that I have to pay every month. This is an expectation of the program, and that’s why I’m going to do it the best I can.”

In one year, Rita saved over $18,000, and is on her way to receiving the deed to her home early. “I have never been in such a financially stable position in my life,” she said. “I was always financially dependent on someone else, but now here we are all on our own. What an amazing feeling!”

Being in their own home had other benefits the whole family could enjoy. Her 15-year-old daughter, Caylin, craved her own room. “She had zero privacy,” Rita said. And Rita needed a way to keep a close eye on her son, 11-year-old Jaydin, who has muscular and neurological disabilities, and requires constant supervision. Jaydin is nonverbal, only weighs 41 pounds, must wear a diaper, and didn’t walk until he was 4½.

In the main open concept living area, Rita can see Jaydin even if she’s washing dishes. He spends time on the deck outside without her worrying he’s too close to the street. “It’s perfect,” she said, “The open concept allows me to give Jaydin a little more freedom yet still know that he is safe.”

Rita and her kids have come to love the community, schools, and citizens of Cambridge over the last 15 months. Rita, who works as a special education paraprofessional at the local middle school, brings Jaydin to work with her in the mornings, where he catches a bus to the elementary school one mile away. In the afternoons, he rides the bus back to the middle school to go home with his mom.

“Everybody has welcomed him with open arms,” Rita said. “They’re so accommodating here.”

Jaydin can continue as a student in the school district until he’s 21. “We plan to stay right here for a long time.”

Caylin is on the high school’s varsity spirit squad, a cheerleading and competitive dance team, and performs with the show choir. She and her mother often volunteer to help with various events and fundraisers, either through the school district or Cambridge’s Community Activities Program, which provides recreational and educational services. “It’s really been good [for] getting to know everybody in the community,” Rita said.

She’s excited she can pay for Caylin’s college. HOTH “not only changed our lives in the present, but this is going to continue to change our lives,” Rita said. “When I’m gone, it will continue to pass on to my kids. It’s an accomplishment I would not have been able to do on my own. For that I am forever grateful.”

Rita has an associate degree and plans to look into taking classes at University of Wisconsin –Whitewater toward a special education teaching degree.

There are many families who still need our help. Check out our Current Needs page and you can help us serve America’s military families today.

Operation Homefront is a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit whose mission is to build strong, stable, and secure military families so they can thrive — not simply struggle to get by — in the communities they have worked so hard to protect. For over fifteen years, we have provided programs that offer: RELIEF (through Critical Financial Assistance and transitional housing programs), RESILIENCY (through permanent housing and caregiver support services) and RECURRING FAMILY SUPPORT programs and services throughout the year that help military families overcome the short-term bumps in the road so they don’t become long-term chronic problems. Please visit us at www.operationhomefront.org to learn more or support our mission.

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Tyler (with family) credits a strong, stable, and secure future to the help of Operation Homefront and our generous supporters.

Former Army Staff Sgt. Tyler Mobra is working to earn a new title — professor.

He originally enlisted in the Army in 2003, deployed twice to Iraq and once to Afghanistan as a cavalry scout, and was medically discharged in 2009 for multiple injuries. Tyler was awarded the Purple Heart for being wounded in action, and the Bronze Star for heroic or meritorious achievement or service. He received the Bronze Star for attempting to save in 2008, along with three others, two allied Afghan soldiers who had been severely wounded in a mortar attack. One survived.

The costs of war are all too high, but Tyler felt the full impact of actual costs of living when he was medically retired.

The Mobras rented a small apartment in Catoosa, OK. Their daughters shared a room, but couldn’t “sleep on bunk beds forever,” he said. He had heard about Operation Homefront’s Homes on the Homefront (HOTH) program and immediately applied. He hoped a HOTH home would become available in the area because he didn’t want to change schools, and they have family nearby.

Operation Homefront awarded a mortgage-free home in 2015 to Tyler and his wife, Mindy, in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma and the family is working with a caseworker and financial counselor to build savings, reduce debit and learn the skills to become successful homeowners. Saving on housing also opens room in the budget for school and other costs, such as traveling to present at professional development conferences, Tyler said.

Tyler acknowledges it’s difficult sometimes to juggle all the responsibilities of working, studying and parenting. He values the financial counseling he received through HOTH, continuing to use the EMoney account they set up because it has been a good tool and a timesaver. The couple has saved over $34,000 in two years, as part of financial goals under HOTH. They also paid off about $8,500 in debt.

“It’s amazing,” he said. Receiving a mortgage- free home is “a life changer. There are no words to fully express how grateful I am,” he said. Without assistance, “we’d be living paycheck to paycheck,” Tyler said, adding that he would not be able to afford the opportunity to work towards a strong, stable, and secure future without the help of Operation Homefront and our generous supporters.

Tyler is now focused on his dream to become a professor. Having been a college student almost continuously since 2010, Tyler decided he liked academia enough to stay in it. He has applied to the University of Oklahoma – Tulsa for a Ph.D. program in leadership, curriculum and supervision, and if accepted will be a doctoral candidate with the goal of teaching at the college level. Tyler is already certified to teach grades K-12 in Oklahoma.

In the meantime, he finished his second master’s degree, in math and science education, from University of Tulsa. His first master’s degree is in environmental health and safety management from Northeastern State University, where he also obtained his bachelor’s degree in the same field in 2013.

There are many families who still need our help. Check out our Current Needs page and you can help us serve America’s military families today.

Operation Homefront is a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit whose mission is to build strong, stable, and secure military families so they can thrive — not simply struggle to get by — in the communities they have worked so hard to protect. For over fifteen years, we have provided programs that offer: RELIEF (through Critical Financial Assistance and transitional housing programs), RESILIENCY (through permanent housing and caregiver support services) and RECURRING FAMILY SUPPORT programs and services throughout the year that help military families overcome the short-term bumps in the road so they don’t become long-term chronic problems. Please visit us at www.operationhomefront.org to learn more or support our mission.

 

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