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Posts Tagged ‘September 11’

NEW YORK, New York (Sept. 11)--Smoke rises in lower Manhattan after the World Trade Centers fall Sept. 11, 2001. USCG photo by PA2 Tom Sperduto

NEW YORK, New York (Sept. 11)–Smoke rises in lower Manhattan after the World Trade Centers fall Sept. 11, 2001. USCG photo by PA2 Tom Sperduto

When we reflect on the events of September 11, 2001, the horror and pain of that day is often mingled with the hope and comfort of the many images and stories of heroism. Our generation had never seen such outpouring of concern and support from Americans, coast to coast.  From those who opened their homes to the stranded, to those who passed out water bottles to first responders near the scenes of tragedy, we were buoyed in our darkest hours by the values and spirit that has defined this country since its founding.

Today, 15 years later, as we pause to reflect this Sunday on Patriot Day, many of us may wonder, “Where has that spirit gone?”  You may hear others wonder aloud whether the America reflected in those days of fellowship and unity is gone, never to be recovered.

But there is one group that still believes.

Our men and women in uniform. And they have arguably carried the biggest burden and paid a heavy cost since that fall of 2001.

We have talked with men and women who joined specifically because of the attacks of September 11.  Some were mere children at the time, but they carried that calling with them until they were old enough to volunteer.  Still others talk about an opportunity given to them, or to their immigrant parents, and of a need to give back.  In the 15 years that Operation Homefront has worked with military and wounded warrior families, we have been amazed time and again at the love and reverence that generations of Americans have for this country.

And when reflecting on their service, the vast majority talk about bonds tighter than family, in some cases, and the privilege of serving with the finest men and women that America has to offer.

It is in these conversations that we see the core values of who we are as a nation, and the resiliency and strength that allows us to weather the darker times.

The men and women of our armed forces come from our communities.  The honor, courage, commitment and call to service comes from the communities they were raised in.  In short, they are America.

And they are not alone.

Support for military families comes from all walks of life. We see it at the events we host around the country. We often partner with other organizations serving other needs in their community, such as mental health and food insecurity. We see the young and the old all doing something to make their little part of the world a better place.

Americans answered the call then, and they continue to answer the call today.

Many say there seems to be a lot of anger in the air these days, whether it’s  talk shows, the web, or social media.  They wonder how to make it better. But we ask you to take a moment and really look around and see that your fellow Americans are still phenomenally friendly, caring, generous, and quick to help when help is needed. Sometimes the opportunity to keep the spirit alive comes to you, other times you need to seek it out.  But it is there.

This September 11 anniversary, we encourage everyone to find a way to keep the spirit alive in their community. It does not always have to be a donation of money or goods, it can be your time, an ear to listen or a shoulder to lean on. A smile to a stranger or stopping to take a moment to talk to someone.

doing so, we can, as in the words of President Bush in his address to the nation, “None of us will ever forget this day, yet we go forward to defend freedom and all that is good and just in our world.”

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Our country’s service members, veterans, and their families have all Answered The Call to serve our nation, sacrificing much in the process. Service comes with many challenges – being apart as a reslt of deployment, the loss of a family member, adjusting to a new community and career, hitting a financial obstacle. Putting the needs of our country before their own, our military personnel and their families have always been committed to protecting us all.

If you are looking for a way to get involved in supporting our military families, we invite you to join our Answer The Call campaign.

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Vets-Day_SquareU.S. Army Specialist Justin Purifoythompson was in the 11th grade when the terrorist attacks on 9/11 occurred. He was so upset about the innocent children who lost their lives that he worked to graduate early so he could serve his country. Justin enlisted U.S. Marine Corps and then later joined the U.S. Army.

During his 13 years of service, Justin deployed six times to Iraq. He survived three roadside bombs, seven concussions, and being shot three times. But it was a hit more powerful than a bullet that eventually brought his service to an end.

Justin was living in Germany and getting ready for his seventh deployment when he started experiencing some strange health symptoms. He was shocked when he diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. The doctors don’t know how or why he got the disease, but it meant he could no longer serve in the military.

Justin moved from Germany to Texas, so he could receive proper medical care at San Antonio Military Medical Center. Around the same time, he went through a divorce which left him in a tough place financially. Others around him said he’d be a good match for rent-free housing at the Operation Homefront Village in San Antonio. He applied and was accepted.

Living at the Operation Homefront Villages gave Justin a secure place from which to start over. After only four months at the Village, he said his bank account had already started filling back up. He was able to save $14,000 and bring his family over from Germany. As time went by, he was able to build a home, find post-military employment, and most importantly, get back to being “Dad” for his children.

“The Villages helped significantly — helped my family become stronger, more stable and more secure while in transition,” said Justin.

“Operation Homefront gave me and my family a new start,” said Purifoythompson. “If we weren’t here, we’d be in a big hole.”

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Operation Homefront is honored to be able to answer the call of our brave men and women in uniform when they need it the most. We are able to do so because of the amazing supporters who stand beside us. If you would like to help answer the call, join us at operationhomefront.net/answerthecall

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woodley

Facing an uncertain future, the Woodley family found hope and a new start at Operation Homefront Villages.

After coming home from his deployment to Iraq in 2008, U.S. Army Sergeant Eric Woodley felt fine, but as time went on, he started to notice he wasn’t the same. Eventually diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, and suddenly, his service to his country, something he held dear, was coming to an end.

Service is in Eric’s blood. He hails from a family of veterans. After the terrible events of September 11, 2001, Eric knew what he had to do. He enlisted in the United States Marines, and deployed with two Marine Expeditionary units. After his term with the Marines was up, Eric joined the Army and deployed on that fateful tour.

Now facing an uncertain future, Eric met with his first and platoon sergeants to discuss his next steps. Transition from service is difficult under the best of circumstances, but when the transition comes quickly and without much notice, the financial and emotional impacts can be devastating on a family. Concerned for Eric and his family’s immediate stability and security, the sergeants suggested he reach out to Operation Homefront and inquire about our programs that address the needs of soldiers like him. It turned out to be the best advice they could have given him.

Eric and his family moved into the Operation Homefront Village in San Antonio. While at Operation Homefront Villages, veterans live rent-free while they go through the transition process. They also undergo one-on-one financial counseling to reduce debt and build savings. Eric was able to save $26,000 to pay off his vehicle note and place enough money in savings to build a brand new home.

On more solid ground, Eric was able to go back to school at ITT Tech University to study cyber-security. He plans to transfer to St. Phillips College shortly to complete his studies. All made possible by his time at the Operation Homefront Village.

Knowing this is made possible by the generous support of concerned Americans touches Eric deeply. He wants our community to know that he is incredibly grateful. He shares, “Thank you. I know so many people out there support our troops, but it’s so different when you can see that someone actually cares enough to help us out.”

Vets-Day_fbthumbBlogOperation Homefront is honored to be able to answer the call of our brave men and women in uniform when they need it the most. We are able to do so because of the amazing supporters who stand beside us. If you would like to help answer the call, join us at operationhomefront.net/answerthecall

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As Americans, we can’t help but feel mixed emotions as the anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 approaches once again. 13 years have passed, and yet we still feel the pain over the senseless loss of life that occurred that day, the fear of a world that can and does change in the blink of an eye. Yet, at that same time, we remember the unity, the courage and heroism exhibited, and the voice of a people who would not be bowed by the actions of those who exist to break the spirit of a nation.

For some, the pain is still fresh even these many years later. And for some, it is just another day. For others, the events of Sept. 11, 2001 was the catalyst for change, a call to action. For millions, it was a call to serve and protect as a member of the United States military.

At Operation Homefront, we have had the privilege and honor to support these men and women for more than 12 years. Each one is an example of what makes this country deserving of the gifts of liberty and freedom and why it continues to be a beacon of hope for so many around the world. The cost to our military and their families has been high:

  • More than 5,000 have given their lives to the cause of freedom.
  • More than 50,000 have been wounded or injured in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • More than 1,700 required amputations.
  • Among service members deployed in these conflicts, 103,792 have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) over the period 2002 to December 2012. Over that same period, 253,330 service members have been diagnosed with a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) of some kind.

          (From the February 2013 Congressional Research Service report)

I remember meeting Jane Horton, widow of Army Specialist Chris Horton, who was killed in action. She wore a black bracelet with Chris’ name as a visible reminder to others that Chris’ sacrifice will not be forgotten. I was moved when she took it from her own wrist and gave it to me, and I’m wearing that bracelet as I write this. I will help to insure Chris will be remembered and the freedom secured by his sacrifice will go on.

As we reflect on the sacrifices made and endured on this anniversary, we must never forget that freedom really isn’t free, but requires constant vigilance. On a daily basis, we are bombarded with vivid images of regional conflicts threatening national boundaries; demands from radical extremists who resort to horrific acts of barbarism to intimidate and inspire fear; and international figures who seek to destabilize their neighbors in hopes of advancing their own self interests.

sept-11-blog-operation-homefront-jim-knottsYet on this anniversary, we should reflect as well on the spirit of a united country that still holds fast. Of neighbors helping neighbors, every day. Those that spread the light to banish the darkness. And that young men and women still answer the call to protect and defend in the face of the unknown and unseen, no matter how far from home it may take them.

Please join me today in honoring the service, sacrifice, courage and commitment of an entire nation, with a special thanks to our active duty military, our veterans, our wounded warriors and their families.

Jim Knotts, President and CEO
Operation Homefront

If you would like to know more about our mission, please visit us at www.operationhomefront.net . At Operation Homefront, we support both active duty families as well as those wounded warriors who are in varying stages of their transition and recovery. Programs like our transitional housing, and permanent mortgage-free housing, serve critical needs for this community. Our emergency financial assistance program remains a lifeline for these families in their times of need. And you can help. We maintain a list of these current needs on our website where, thanks to your support, we are able to make a difference for these families every day. Or you could give a general donation to be used for any one of our programs.

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This is a memorable day for all of us. Even if we didn’t know a single soul lost in the terrorist attacks, the catastrophe touched us all.

Operation Homefront was founded in the wake of those attacks. Once service members started deploying, concerned patriots saw the struggle families faced. They banded together to find ways to help, and their movement quickly grew.

Today we have chapters across the country made up mostly of volunteers. Nothing can make up for the lives lost and the families torn apart on this day nine years ago, but the people who’ve stepped up to serve in the military and in nonprofit organizations are helping our nation heal.

So thank you — to our military members, to our volunteers, our supporters and fellow nonprofit agencies. Today we remember not just the tragedy of the attacks, but the heroism, generosity and compassion that followed the devastation.

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