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Archive for the ‘September 11’ Category

Former Marine Sayku Dudley describes his childhood in Atlanta, Georgia, as rough. As a kid, Sayku was motivated to find a better life for himself.

Sayku started going to softball games and barbeques hosted by local military recruiters and became good friends with one of them.

“As things became worse in my environment,” said Sayku, “I decided to … join the military. As I was deciding which branch of service to go into, I thought the Marines looked the toughest and the fittest. I went into the Marines because I wanted to look like that guy who stood out from the rest.”

dudleyAfter basic training at Paris Island, South Carolina, Sayku was stationed at Twenty-nine Palms, the Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Command in California.  He spent time in Japan and Mexico before returning to Atlanta to join the Marine Reserves.

After 9/11, Sayku deployed to Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan.  “I was almost killed,” said Sayku. “But I recovered.” Eventually he came back to Georgia. “My career was cut short at the end,” said Sayku. “I am fighting for medical retirement. I have had multiple personal problems. I have lost stripes. Since 2009, I have been going through the storm of my life.”

Sayku struggles with depression and post-traumatic stress. His financial situation was bleak and he faced having his lights and utilities shut off. He first turned to Wounded Warrior Project for help, and in turn, they referred him to Operation Homefront.  Operation Homefront was able to provide   the financial assistance he needed during a difficult financial time.

Sakyu request was just one of over 1,700 military families we’ve helped so far this year, and one of 11,000 since our inception in 2012.  89.4% of our 2016 clients surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that OH’s Emergency Assistance Program helps build strong, stable, and secure military families.

Sayku is thankful that things are better now than they were last year. “I was in a mental state that I didn’t know I was in or how to get out. After I left the military, I had problems and haven’t been able to do. This is not where I ever thought I would be.”

To those who donate to OH, Sayku said, “There are not a lot of words. I would rather do than say. I am so very thankful. I am glad that you (OH) was able to help me. Asking for help really checks your pride. I am very thankful for the help, and I am on a new path and thanks to you I can do for now. I definitely know what it’s like to not have. It’s very humbling to be where I am.”

Sayku recently began work at Home Depot part-time. “I haven’t been in the work world for a while,” said Sayku. “This is a new start. I have been on a rocky road filled with debts and family problems. But now I am in a different place and keep remembering how far I came. I am starting over new. This time I am going to succeed either by working multiple jobs or going back to school.”

Join in the conversation with us as we celebrate those veterans among us, by sharing stories of your own. Through Facebook or Twitter, please use the hashtag #11days11stories to share your own inspirational story of a veteran in your life.

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NEW YORK, New York (Sept. 11)--Smoke rises in lower Manhattan after the World Trade Centers fall Sept. 11, 2001. USCG photo by PA2 Tom Sperduto

NEW YORK, New York (Sept. 11)–Smoke rises in lower Manhattan after the World Trade Centers fall Sept. 11, 2001. USCG photo by PA2 Tom Sperduto

When we reflect on the events of September 11, 2001, the horror and pain of that day is often mingled with the hope and comfort of the many images and stories of heroism. Our generation had never seen such outpouring of concern and support from Americans, coast to coast.  From those who opened their homes to the stranded, to those who passed out water bottles to first responders near the scenes of tragedy, we were buoyed in our darkest hours by the values and spirit that has defined this country since its founding.

Today, 15 years later, as we pause to reflect this Sunday on Patriot Day, many of us may wonder, “Where has that spirit gone?”  You may hear others wonder aloud whether the America reflected in those days of fellowship and unity is gone, never to be recovered.

But there is one group that still believes.

Our men and women in uniform. And they have arguably carried the biggest burden and paid a heavy cost since that fall of 2001.

We have talked with men and women who joined specifically because of the attacks of September 11.  Some were mere children at the time, but they carried that calling with them until they were old enough to volunteer.  Still others talk about an opportunity given to them, or to their immigrant parents, and of a need to give back.  In the 15 years that Operation Homefront has worked with military and wounded warrior families, we have been amazed time and again at the love and reverence that generations of Americans have for this country.

And when reflecting on their service, the vast majority talk about bonds tighter than family, in some cases, and the privilege of serving with the finest men and women that America has to offer.

It is in these conversations that we see the core values of who we are as a nation, and the resiliency and strength that allows us to weather the darker times.

The men and women of our armed forces come from our communities.  The honor, courage, commitment and call to service comes from the communities they were raised in.  In short, they are America.

And they are not alone.

Support for military families comes from all walks of life. We see it at the events we host around the country. We often partner with other organizations serving other needs in their community, such as mental health and food insecurity. We see the young and the old all doing something to make their little part of the world a better place.

Americans answered the call then, and they continue to answer the call today.

Many say there seems to be a lot of anger in the air these days, whether it’s  talk shows, the web, or social media.  They wonder how to make it better. But we ask you to take a moment and really look around and see that your fellow Americans are still phenomenally friendly, caring, generous, and quick to help when help is needed. Sometimes the opportunity to keep the spirit alive comes to you, other times you need to seek it out.  But it is there.

This September 11 anniversary, we encourage everyone to find a way to keep the spirit alive in their community. It does not always have to be a donation of money or goods, it can be your time, an ear to listen or a shoulder to lean on. A smile to a stranger or stopping to take a moment to talk to someone.

doing so, we can, as in the words of President Bush in his address to the nation, “None of us will ever forget this day, yet we go forward to defend freedom and all that is good and just in our world.”

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Our country’s service members, veterans, and their families have all Answered The Call to serve our nation, sacrificing much in the process. Service comes with many challenges – being apart as a reslt of deployment, the loss of a family member, adjusting to a new community and career, hitting a financial obstacle. Putting the needs of our country before their own, our military personnel and their families have always been committed to protecting us all.

If you are looking for a way to get involved in supporting our military families, we invite you to join our Answer The Call campaign.

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Vets-Day_SquareU.S. Army Specialist Justin Purifoythompson was in the 11th grade when the terrorist attacks on 9/11 occurred. He was so upset about the innocent children who lost their lives that he worked to graduate early so he could serve his country. Justin enlisted U.S. Marine Corps and then later joined the U.S. Army.

During his 13 years of service, Justin deployed six times to Iraq. He survived three roadside bombs, seven concussions, and being shot three times. But it was a hit more powerful than a bullet that eventually brought his service to an end.

Justin was living in Germany and getting ready for his seventh deployment when he started experiencing some strange health symptoms. He was shocked when he diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. The doctors don’t know how or why he got the disease, but it meant he could no longer serve in the military.

Justin moved from Germany to Texas, so he could receive proper medical care at San Antonio Military Medical Center. Around the same time, he went through a divorce which left him in a tough place financially. Others around him said he’d be a good match for rent-free housing at the Operation Homefront Village in San Antonio. He applied and was accepted.

Living at the Operation Homefront Villages gave Justin a secure place from which to start over. After only four months at the Village, he said his bank account had already started filling back up. He was able to save $14,000 and bring his family over from Germany. As time went by, he was able to build a home, find post-military employment, and most importantly, get back to being “Dad” for his children.

“The Villages helped significantly — helped my family become stronger, more stable and more secure while in transition,” said Justin.

“Operation Homefront gave me and my family a new start,” said Purifoythompson. “If we weren’t here, we’d be in a big hole.”

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Operation Homefront is honored to be able to answer the call of our brave men and women in uniform when they need it the most. We are able to do so because of the amazing supporters who stand beside us. If you would like to help answer the call, join us at operationhomefront.net/answerthecall

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Facing an uncertain future, the Woodley family found hope and a new start at Operation Homefront Villages.

After coming home from his deployment to Iraq in 2008, U.S. Army Sergeant Eric Woodley felt fine, but as time went on, he started to notice he wasn’t the same. Eventually diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, and suddenly, his service to his country, something he held dear, was coming to an end.

Service is in Eric’s blood. He hails from a family of veterans. After the terrible events of September 11, 2001, Eric knew what he had to do. He enlisted in the United States Marines, and deployed with two Marine Expeditionary units. After his term with the Marines was up, Eric joined the Army and deployed on that fateful tour.

Now facing an uncertain future, Eric met with his first and platoon sergeants to discuss his next steps. Transition from service is difficult under the best of circumstances, but when the transition comes quickly and without much notice, the financial and emotional impacts can be devastating on a family. Concerned for Eric and his family’s immediate stability and security, the sergeants suggested he reach out to Operation Homefront and inquire about our programs that address the needs of soldiers like him. It turned out to be the best advice they could have given him.

Eric and his family moved into the Operation Homefront Village in San Antonio. While at Operation Homefront Villages, veterans live rent-free while they go through the transition process. They also undergo one-on-one financial counseling to reduce debt and build savings. Eric was able to save $26,000 to pay off his vehicle note and place enough money in savings to build a brand new home.

On more solid ground, Eric was able to go back to school at ITT Tech University to study cyber-security. He plans to transfer to St. Phillips College shortly to complete his studies. All made possible by his time at the Operation Homefront Village.

Knowing this is made possible by the generous support of concerned Americans touches Eric deeply. He wants our community to know that he is incredibly grateful. He shares, “Thank you. I know so many people out there support our troops, but it’s so different when you can see that someone actually cares enough to help us out.”

Vets-Day_fbthumbBlogOperation Homefront is honored to be able to answer the call of our brave men and women in uniform when they need it the most. We are able to do so because of the amazing supporters who stand beside us. If you would like to help answer the call, join us at operationhomefront.net/answerthecall

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Sept. 11, 2001. In an instant, our sense of invulnerability was gone. An enemy attack here at home, only rivaled by Pearl Harbor 60 years before. Nearly 3,000 lives were lost, each one linked to a family, a home, a good life.

Americans have an uncanny ability to turn grief into motivation. We took a heavy blow on that day, but it was nowhere near a knockout. Why? Because of our American spirit. It is impossible to quantify or calculate or defeat.

Our ancestors had it when they came here seeking a new land of opportunity. Our forefathers fought for it and scribed it between the lines of the Declaration of Independence. The early pioneers carried it with them across wild plains and jagged mountains. The Civil War forced us to look ourselves in the eye and give everyone the right to claim it. The best and brightest forged a future of creativity and industry, inspired by it. The greatest generation had it in spades through the wars of the early 20th century. And we could go on and on.

Only 14 years separate us from that fateful day. 5,113 days. And every day, we’ve relied on our American spirit in one form or another.

For our military community, the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks meant 13 years of war. More than 6,000 brave Americans lost their lives in a combat zone while more than 52,000 have been wounded in action. Yet the American spirit persists. It’s with the soldier halfway across the world as he focuses on his mission. It’s with the family waiting for mom to come home safely from deployment. It keeps a wounded hero company in his most difficult hours. It spurs an entire nation to patriotism and pride in those who sacrifice so much for our freedom. It is the backbone of who we are.

Whether it’s defined as tenacity, gumption, chutzpah, initiative or plain old orneriness, our American spirit leads us forward. Deep within us is the desire to rise up and reject an act of hatred meant to crush us.

It is this passion that is the force behind movements like the 9/11 Day, the largest annual day of charitable engagement in the United States. Each year more than 40 million Americans observe September 11 by performing good deeds that help others.

How will you observe Sept. 11? Pause for a moment to reflect on that day, not so long ago. And never forget those fellow Americans and their families who paid a terrible price. Then, make a difference. Volunteer. Give back. There is no better way to honor those whose memory will stay with us forever.

At Operation Homefront, thousands of military families come to us to help them get through tough times so they can move forward to a stable and more secure future. We couldn’t do it without help from our generous donors. You can give too, and join the national effort to turn tragedy into an opportunity to shine.

 

 

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